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Ireland Gallery

Choose from 64 pictures in our Ireland collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


People are seen walking a path towards Dun Aonghasa (not in view) Featured Ireland Print

People are seen walking a path towards Dun Aonghasa (not in view)

People are seen walking on a path towards Dun Aonghasa (not in view), a pre-historic stone fort dated from 1100BC on the remote Aran Islands in Galway, Ireland May 13, 2016 REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Aerial View, Air, Creative Use, Day, Distant, Environment, Ground, Kywdpcs, Landmark, Nature, Path, People, Unrecognisable, View From Above, Walk, Weather

A dog runs through a park after heavy snowfall in Londonderry Featured Ireland Print

A dog runs through a park after heavy snowfall in Londonderry

A dog runs through a park after heavy snowfall in Londonderry, northern Ireland January 14, 2015. Over 100 schools closed on Wednesday after heavy snowfall in northern Ireland, local media reported. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS) - LM1EB1E11H901

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View from the Lawn, Dennicanniby, 1870s. Creator: Vernon Heath (British, 1819-1895) Featured Ireland Print

View from the Lawn, Dennicanniby, 1870s. Creator: Vernon Heath (British, 1819-1895)

View from the Lawn, Dennicanniby, 1870s. A distinguished photographer who received royal patronage, Vernon Heath traveled extensively throughout the British Isles documenting estates and landscapes on commission. This carefully composed scenic view, taken just above the Upper Lake of Three Lakes of Killarney in southwest Ireland, exemplifies the pioneering technique he developed in the early 1860s for enlarging 12x10-inch glass negatives. Made when contact printing was the norm, Heath's carbon-printed enlargements showed no distortion and preserved the general artistic effect, which brought praise from the photographic press. Through his outstanding ability to manipulate wet collodion plates in the field, he excelled at controlling light and rendering aerial perspective. Indeed, Heath was highly acclaimed for the pictorial detail and faithful description of the picturesque scenes his Victorian audience so admired. By 1871 the carbon pigment process was his preferred method for printing. It produced a softening effect and greater gradation of tone in his photographs while rendering them impervious to fading caused by natural light

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